Illahee 2/18/17 Photos, Storm Damage, Preserve Birds, Geese, Work Party, Knot Weed, Olympia Oysters

Photos.  Spring flowers emerging and ducks returning to the Preserve detention pond.

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Storm Damage.  Lots of limbs down in the area after the snow, along with a number of trees down in the Preserve.  The tree clean up was done on Tuesday by two groups from the Illahee Stewardship Committee, to prepare for the Friday work party. 
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Preserve Birds.  Thanks again to Chris for more bird photos from the Preserve.
 

I had an amazing walk today. I counted at least 11 different species surviving the winter in the Illahee Preserve:

 
2 Pileated Woodpeckers
1 Red-breasted Sapsucker (pic attached)
3 Golden-crowned Kinglets
1 American Robin
1 Varied Thrush
Many Dark-eyed Juncos
1 American Crow
2 Grey Squirrels
2 Douglas Squirrels
1 Brown Creeper
1 Pacific Wren
Red-breasted Sapsucker
Geese.  A newcomer that isn’t being accepted by the Canada geese.  We have no idea what kind it is. The next photo is of Canada geese who are now matched up and becoming territorial as they look at nesting sites.
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Work Party.  Washington Youth Academy (WYA) cadets (numbering 52) moved all the wood chips to trails on Friday.  Thanks to the Rotary (East Bremerton Club) for arranging for the WYA cadets, the wood chips, the tool and wheelbarrow storage container (courtesy of United Storage), the portable toilet (courtesy of Jim Fox), and the 10 supervisors who directed and helped with the efforts.
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Knot Weed.  Knot weed is an invasive species that is particularly troubling along fresh water and salt water shorelines.  The photos below show one reason it is hard to kill is because of its massive root structure that can extend out nearly 10 feet.
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Olympia Oysters.  A much better find on the shoreline was what appears to be the smaller, but native, Olympia oysters.  
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Jim Aho